Dividend Cut And Suspension List – What To Do

Several companies cut or suspended their dividend in early 2020 amid the Covid-19 impact on the economy. Should you keep your shares or not? This is the answer we will give you according to our dividend growth investing model. Some deserve to be kept even after a cut, but be prepared to be ruthless against most dividend cutters.

Dividend Cut & Suspension List

In this new section, we will track to the best of our knowledge all the dividend cuts and suspensions announced by companies we follow during the Covid-19 crisis. This is not a complete list as we wanted to provide additional comments on most companies listed below. We will also tell you if we consider the company a “hold” or a “sell” depending on the reason why it cut/suspended its dividend.

Company Name

Ticker

Cut/Suspension

Hold / Sell

Vermilion Energy

VET

83% cut

SELL

Occidental Petroleum

OXY

79% cut

SELL

Park Hotels & Resorts

PK

Suspension

HOLD

Crescent Point Energy

CPG

75% cut

SELL

Marriott International

MAR

Suspension

HOLD

Ford

F

Suspension

SELL

Boeing

BA

Suspension

HOLD

Delta Air Lines

DAL

Suspension

HOLD

Darden Restaurants

DRI

Suspension

HOLD

TJX Companies

TJX

Suspension

HOLD

Helmerich & Payne

HP

65% cut

SELL

LEAR

LEA

Suspension

HOLD

Anheuser-Busch InBev

BUD

50% cut

SELL

Additional thoughts for each dividend cutters

Vermilion Energy

VET posted a disastrous quarter and blamed the virus for the dividend cut! The company says it cut the dividend in response to “weakness in commodity prices and reduced global economic prospects following the outbreak of the novel coronavirus.” Q4 fund flows from operations totaled $216M, in line with the previous quarter despite a significant inventory build in Australia, while full-year FFO hit a record $908M, up 8% Y/Y. Q4 production rose 1% Q/Q to 97,875 boe/day, and full-year output increased 15% to a record 100,357 boe/day, reflecting a full-year contribution from assets acquired in 2018 and organic growth from the Netherlands, Australia and the U.S.

Occidental Petroleum

According to management, the oil price could go down as low as $40 a barrel and OXY will maintain both its production and dividend. It seems that under $40 (we are way past that level), the company is in deep trouble. At DSR, we are not fans of companies maintaining the status quo without offering growth perspectives. The other major problem is that the market doesn’t like the merger with Anadarko (NYSE:APC) in a $55B deal. Investors are concerned by the level of debt, and financial analysts issued concerns around the expected synergies to be created. JPMorgan thinks it will destroy value rather than creating it.

Park Hotels & Resorts

PK is present in all the strong US markets (California, New York, Hawaii, Florida). Properties in flourishing states such as California, Florida, and Hawaii will continue to attract clients for their vacations or business trip once the economy reopens. Through its sheer size and strong balance sheet, PK is among a small elite number of investors that can bid on large real estate deals.

Crescent Point Energy

The CEO can say pretty much whatever he wants; it’s too late to change our mind. With the latest oil bust in early March, we don’t see how CPG can recover losses for investors. It’s time to move on. The Company says it remains on track with its 2020 budget, with annual average production of 140,000 to 144,000 boe/d and capital expenditures of C$1.10B-C$1.20B. The Company’s net debt was ~C$2.8B, down from ~C$4B last year quarter, subsequent to the quarter.

Marriott International

MAR doesn’t need a presentation. The company operates several strong brands across the world and can account for a loyalty membership program with over 125M users (!). The loyalty program represents about 50% of all rooms reserved and is a great source of continuous cash flow. MAR usually sets up long-term contracts (20 years) with its franchisees, which brings a lot of stability. With such an impressive portfolio, let’s just say it’s not hard to find more franchisees; the demand is strong.

Ford

F’s industry is cyclical, and experts fear the top of the hill is ahead. As Ford faces strong competition and the recession is obviously here, consumers may stick to their old F150s. The second problem is the pension plan that is underfunded by $8.9 billion. Remember GM’s (NYSE:GM) problems in this regard in 2008? The market correction is the last thing F needed. Unions are strong in this sector and this could also hurt in the current recession. At the same time, Ford is required to invest massively to electrify its vehicles. Not a great combo.

Boeing

One word: speculation. Boeing is a great business, but market crisis will leave terrible scars in this industry. It’s hard to make up your mind on this one.

Darden Restaurants

Darden is one of the largest players in casual dining and has enjoyed the past decade of economic growth to boost its restaurant portfolio. The company increased the number of restaurants across its brands along with the acquisition of more chains along the way. Darden is an expert in bringing customers in and improving its operating margin. The introduction of technology combined with a straight-forward process has made its restaurants among the most profitable. Many successful strategies coming out of Olive Garden can be applied across its portfolio. There is still place for growth by acquisitions as this market is highly fragmented (DRI owns about 4% market share of the $185B industry). DRI has only suspended its dividend because its restaurants are closed. Can’t make money with closed doors, right?

TJX Companies

Because the classic retailers’ revenue growth has been greatly declining over the past five years, many conclude the brick and mortar retail model is nearly dead. Still, there are good buys to be had. TJX Companies looks like an interesting play in the off-price retail business. One of the biggest advantages of this business model is probably the merchandise flexibility. Goods sold constantly evolve and adapt according to clients’ needs. Even better, because each store receives new stuff continuously, this invites customers to return to their favorite store more often to “hunt” for their deals. People just love getting deals!

Helmerich & Payne

HP is a great business in a bad industry. The company had great market shares, but drillers are just not going to do well with such low energy prices. There is not much you can do about it. Just move on.

LEAR

The auto parts industry is highly competitive and highly cyclical. The current slowdown in the automotive industry combined with the global economy pushed LEAR far down and forced a dividend suspension. LEAR is #2 in the seating market and claims the first spot when we look at luxury and performance seating. The company has built close relationships with car manufacturers which makes switching costs higher. LEAR has also integrated a strong innovation culture which enables it to offer top-of-the-line products to its customers.

Anheuser-Busch InBev

BUD previously cut its dividend in 2018 as the business couldn’t find any growth vectors. We rated the company as a sell back then. The second cut will not make us like the stock!

Original post

Editor’s Note: The summary bullets for this article were chosen by Seeking Alpha editors.

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